cathepsut: (flaming june)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Deadly Nightshade (Deadly Mystery, #1)Deadly Nightshade (Deadly Mystery, #1) by Victor J. Banis

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The characters were fairly one-dimensional and not believable as police detectives. The who-dunnit was too straight forward and simple.
Both main characters were walking cliches. Especially the straight cop in this dynamic duo was portrayed as so simple and uneducated, that I wonder how he ever made detective.
Someone looking for a proper cop story should stay away from this. But if you are looking for a little light reading with some not very deep romance thrown in, it'll be fine. Take it with you to the beach!
cathepsut: (food)
[personal profile] cathepsut
The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to EatThe Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to Eat by Loren Cordain

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

"The modern dietary regimen known as the Paleolithic diet, also popularly referred to as the caveman diet, Stone Age diet and hunter-gatherer diet, is a nutritional plan based on the presumed ancient diet of wild plants and animals that various human species habitually consumed during the Paleolithic era, that ended around 10,000 years ago with the development of agriculture. Centered on commonly available modern foods, the "contemporary" Paleolithic diet consists mainly of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, roots, and nuts, and excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar, and processed oils."

(yanked from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleo_diet and slightly abbreviated)

I like the basic idea and I would definitely be better off with a dairy- and grain-free diet, considering my digestive problems and my lactose-intolerance. I am not really sold on the argument that this diet is the right one because it's how our stoneage relatives ate and that the rise of agrarian cultures is the root of all evil. Our genetics might not have changed all that much, but our bodies for example adapted to dairy, so ruling out nature's ability to change with the cirumstances sounds narrow minded to me.

It also bugged me that the author kept up a constant advertising of the book and its principles. I bought the book, so I am obviously interested. I don't want to read three chapters telling me how bad all the other diets are for me and praising the one supposedly explained later in the book that I'm already holding in my hands. I just want to get on with it.

The constant repetition was also... well... very repetitive.

So, idea good, I'm interested and will try to apply the principles of the diet. The book as such did not really do it for me.

Book Nook

May. 16th, 2011 01:20 am
cathepsut: (vampire cape)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Forgot to post this one...

Dead ReckoningDead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I liked it better than Dead in the Family. It had more of a plot and at times was even fun. Ultimately there was not a lot of substance and I found the relationship with Eric as well as the ending of the book unsatisfying. The series might have run its course, there does not seem much left to tell. Maybe Charlaine Harris can prove me wrong with the next book...

Book Nook

May. 16th, 2011 01:17 am
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Die Weltreise einer roten Fleeceweste: Eine kleine Geschichte über die große GlobalisierungDie Weltreise einer roten Fleeceweste: Eine kleine Geschichte über die große Globalisierung by Wolfgang Korn

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A book for young adults, that attempts to explain globalisation. It does that by following the life cycle of a red fleece vest, from the crude oil that is won off the coast of Dubai to be turned into the polyethylen that is used to make the fabric for the vest and many more steps via Bangladesh to Europe and finally Africa. It's nicely done and well explained. I am pretty sure that some of the details aren't quite right, but as a starting point to understand how global business works it is a nice attempt.
cathepsut: (food)
[personal profile] cathepsut
The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to EatThe Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to Eat by Loren Cordain

"The modern dietary regimen known as the Paleolithic diet, also popularly referred to as the caveman diet, Stone Age diet and hunter-gatherer diet, is a nutritional plan based on the presumed ancient diet of wild plants and animals that various human species habitually consumed during the Paleolithic era, that ended around 10,000 years ago with the development of agriculture. Centered on commonly available modern foods, the "contemporary" Paleolithic diet consists mainly of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, roots, and nuts, and excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar, and processed oils."

(yanked from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleo_diet and slightly abbreviated)

I haven't started the book yet, but I can't see mysyelf going completely without dairy. I am willing to switch away from cow's milk and completely to sheep and goat.

No grain will be a tough one. Buckwheat is actually a grass, not wheat, right?

And no legumes? Dang it, I don't think so. I love lentils and peas and beans... Sigh!

More when I actually started to read this book!
cathepsut: (food)
[personal profile] cathepsut
The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to EatThe Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Food You Were Designed to Eat by Loren Cordain

I just bought this. After browsing Amazon and reading synopsis and reviews on related books, I decided for this one. Most people seem to think that the author is very good. It's pretty much what health guy was preaching during our herbalism tour. I'll give it a try.... maybe....

I also put a book by a German author on my wishlist. It's called "Living without bread". Sounds depressing. :-)
cathepsut: (vampire cape)
[personal profile] cathepsut
I just transferred my Kindle account from amazon.com to amazon.de. I noticed the German mirror site a few days ago, not sure how long it's been there. I hope I won't regret it. There seems to be a lot of content in English. All my settings moved as well, I just lost my Kindle wishlist. But I didn't have too many books on it, so it was a quick job to find those books again and create a new ebook wishlist. So far, so good.

I just pre-ordered Dead Reckoning by Charlaine Harris. Delivery date 3rd of May. I hope I can get it straight away at midnight... The price finally dropped from an outrageous 23 dollars something to slightly over 16 dollars. In the German Kindle shop I save a few cents, but that'll probably vary with the exchange rate. The ebook is 1 Euro more than the paperback. I can live with that!

***

Finally finished last night, just in time for Sookie:

Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake, #3)Sovereign by C.J. Sansom

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Mysterious things are afoot in the town of York. A conspiracy of major proportions is tucked away somewhere.

As usual with Sansom, the story is alive with the sounds and smells of Tudor England. Descriptions are excellent. It's easy to get immersed into his world, you can almost feel, taste and especially smell it.

Page 122: "We walked to Stonegate as the sun rose up and the city came to life, keeping under the eaves as people opened their windows and threw the night's piss into the streets."

There is a surprising amount of swearing going on for historical novels.

When I read his books, it always makes me sad to contemplate how many beautiful things Henry VIII destroyed with his dissolution.

I keep jumping back to the computer to read up on historic events and characters mentioned in the books, it's always a very educational experience for me.

The whole question of succession regarding Richard III, the princes in the tower and the War of the Roses has always confused me a lot and now I get something else confusing thrown into the mix.

Some further reading that contains spoilers -- I suggest not looking at this until you have read the book:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_IV_o...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereign_%...
http://www.york.ac.uk/ipup/projects/york...

The last 200 pages dragged on a bit for me. At times Sansom's books seem to be a little too cosy, until the next twist hits you and the plot moves back to nail biting suspense.

***

Gave up:

A Taste of Crimson (Crimson City, #2)A Taste of Crimson by Marjorie M. Liu

My rating: 1 of 5 stars


Giving up on this one. I made it to page 80 with several stops and starts.

I do not like the vague SF setting. It bothered me already in the first book -- it's hinted at, but not really explored and somehow it feels confined and claustrophobic to me. I know, sounds stupid, but I don't know how else to explain it.

And that the two main characters suddenly decide that they are soul mates and in love with each other after they have just met and barely exchanged any words -- it could work and it has in other books I've read -- here it just feels silly.

Not for me. Perhaps it would have grown on me after another 100 pages, but I'd rather read something I enjoy from the start...
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake, #3)Sovereign by C.J. Sansom

Well, the 24 hours are up. I made good progress today, but I lost 9 hours being out and about and 6 hours sleeping... I was just too knackered. I will spend most of today reading and make up for it, the book has gripped me now and I want to know as much as possible as soon as possible. I keep jumping back to the computer to read up on historic events mentioned in the book and also characters. I guess I will know a lot more about the Tudors when I finish this. The whole question of succession regarding Richard III and those princes in the tower and the War of the Roses has always confused me a lot and now I get something else confusing thrown in the mix.

But now I'll get dressed, take out the garbage, get my Sunday paper from the mailbox and make some lunch. Pancakes again, maybe? I'll see.

Oh, and I want to a write a letter and need to prepare a book to send out for Bookmooch.

Is anybody here interested in Dead In The Family by Charlaine Harris? I searched wishlists on BookCrossing and offered it, but nobody wanted it. Very strange.
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake #3)Sovereign by C.J. Sansom

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Three chapters in, so far so good. The story is getting set up, I think we are slowly approaching the first corpse. I like it so far.
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
1)Where are you reading from today?


2)Three random facts about me...
I brush my teeth in the shower, I love cats and I love to eat olives with cheese.

3)How many books do you have in your TBR pile for the next 24 hours?
I have three that I am currently reading, but I leave that up to chance and how I feel at any given moment.

4)Do you have any goals for the read-a-thon (i.e. number of books, number of pages, number of hours, or number of comments on blogs)?
Not really, I see how it goes. I'm going out tonight, so I won't be able to do all of the 24 hours anyway. Maybe next year!

5)If you’re a veteran read-a-thoner, any advice for people doing this for the first time?
Not a veteran.
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Current reads for the 24-hour read-a-thon:

A Taste of Crimson (Crimson City, #2)A Taste of Crimson by Marjorie M. Liu

Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake #3)Sovereign by C.J. Sansom

The Silent World (Adventure Classics)The Silent World by Jacques-Yves Cousteau
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Oh, forgot to mention, on All Romance you can download one free romance novel per day until the 21st of April. Not sure about the quality and some of them sound incredibly cheesy. I download a supernatural one that sounds a bit like Harry Potter at a US college, a gay cop story and something with shapeshifters. Reading fodder for my Kindle!

Go here and click on the banner, it will take you to the free book of the day. You need to sign up with your address, but don't need to give any payment details, so I don't think that is a big deal. I did have to give them a state though, even after listing Germany as my country and they obviously only list the US states. So I now reside in Alabama! :-)
cathepsut: (24read-a-thon)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Interesting discussion again over on [community profile] ebooks on ebooks versus traditional publishing. The post is basically a collection of links to people that bash ebooks. Fairly entertaining. A big issue was the pirating of books.

I get the arguments and I can relate to some extent regarding piracy and how it damages sales and will maybe make books go away forever....!!?!

What I never get in this --people have always shared books, gotten them for free from others that got them for free from someone else. Just look at paperbackswap, bookcrossing, bookmooch and countless other sites like them. Nobody bitches that they damage sales. I have about 100 unread paper books on my shelf. I actually bought about 10 of them. Maybe 5 or so were presents, all the others I got through Bookcrossing and Bookmooch. How is that so different from downloading books for free from the Internet? Ok, piracy, illegal, sure. But the idea behind it is the same--someone gets a book and then shares it. Ok, Internet = higher turnover. But still... Maybe I'm naive.

Why not make it easier to lend and borrow ebooks freely? Why the restrictions? And don't give me the copyright argument. I mooch books from allover the world, surely those are copyrighted somehow as well and I still get them.

I am perfectly happy to pay for ebooks, if the prices are reasonable. In my case that means not more than the mass market paperback. Or Kindle bargains under 5 Dollars...

I am waiting for the new Sookie Stackhouse. Currently the ebook is listed at around 14 dollars for US residents and 23 dollars for others. I probably could have warmed up to the 14 dollars, if the paper book was only slightly cheaper. But over 20? No bloody way! It's almost as if they want to discourage peple from getting the ebook and push them onto paper.

In an ideal world I have bluetooth on my reader, you have bluetooth on yours and voila! I bought one DRMd book so far. I guess books bought in the Kindle store have DRM as well? I would prefer to boycott them completely, but that would limit my choices a lot.

I love that Calibre started collecting DRM-free books, I actually sent the guy a donation...

The read-a-thon starts in about 2 hours...
cathepsut: (vampire cape)
[personal profile] cathepsut
Dead in the Family Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris (Sookie Stackhouse #11--or #10, if you don't count Touch of Dead...)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The last one hundred pages or so were pretty good. Turns and twists and suspense. The two hundred-odd pages before that were meh. Not good, not bad, they flowed along pleasantly. Not much of a plot, really. Could Sookie have run her course? I guess the next book will show.

I have been watching reruns of the first two seasons of the show in the past few weeks and it's messing with my internal landscape. Fact that differ from book to TV adaptation make me go "Huh?" I wonder how Charlaine Harris deals with that? Do they have to ask her if it's ok to change something, does she have to sign off on it?

Reading next:

Sovereign (Matthew Shardlake #3)Sovereign by C.J. Sansom (Shardlake #3)

I just weighed this monster... 760 grams and it's huge. If this isn't an argument for switching to eReaders, I don't know what is.
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
The Fine Art of Italian Cooking: The Classic Cookbook, Updated & ExpandedThe Fine Art of Italian Cooking: The Classic Cookbook, Updated & Expanded by Giuliano Bugialli

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


I own a 2005 hardcover edition. It is mostly recipes from the area of Tuscany. Over 600 pages and only 6 of them are about pizza. Hand-draw illustrations, no shiny, glossy food photography, lots of text, lots of additional explanations, old fashioned and absolutely lovely. I adore this book. It has sauce stains in it and the pages where the making of polenta is explained are a mess, because I kept touching the pages while trying it out. I keep writing in it when I change something or add cross-references to other recipes. I write the page numbers of my favourite recipes on the first page -- in short, the book is a mess. Great book!

If you want a really good cookbook for Italian food, get this.
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
The Awakening & Other Short StoriesThe Awakening & Other Short Stories by Kate Chopin

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

37% into the book, I give up. It was interesting in the beginning, but now it just bores me. I know, it is supposed to be an important feminist novella, but snoooore.

***


Last weekend I started this one....

A Taste of Crimson (Crimson City, #2)A Taste of Crimson by Marjorie M. Liu


I worked late every day and I had to play a lot with my new toys, but still-- I should have made it further than page 49. The first book was ok. Perhaps I should have a rule of thumb--if the first book in a series is only "ok", don't get the next one...

***


This might be the touch of death for Crimson City.... The next Sookie was in my mailbox this morning:

Dead in the Family  Dead in the Family by Charlaine Harris


I am now debating the next book with myself. I could get it as a regular paperback in a month or wait for a year to get the mass market paperback for half the price. The Kindle edition costs a ridiculous 23 dollars. Do they not want people to buy ebooks or what is the deal here?

Book Nook

Mar. 20th, 2011 01:35 pm
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
River Marked (Mercedes Thompson #6)River Marked by Patricia Briggs

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

What do you call Urban Fantsay without an urban setting? Is it just Fantasy? Because in this one Mercy and Adam are running around in the wilderness and get wet a lot in rivers.

Good suspense, straight forward story, lots of action. It wasn't breathtaking, but a good, solid read. Interesting detour into Native American Folklore.

Sending this one out to a BC friend.

Book Nook

Mar. 13th, 2011 08:07 pm
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
As Lie the Dead (Dreg City, #2)As Lie the Dead by Kelly Meding

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

You should read the first book, Three Days To Dead, before starting this one. I think you will be lost otherwise. The world portrayed here is not too complex, but definitely different enough. The second book does not supply a lot of explanations of the structure of book's society.

The book's premise is the same as for the first book--three days to achieve something seemingly impossible. I wonder if the third book does the same? Which would be boring.

I liked the first book a lot, I struggled with this book. There was just as much action and some interesting new characters. I have not figured out yet why this book did not grip me as much.

I did not like the odd chapters going back in time. The information in those chapters was nice to have, but not necessary to keep the plot going. They felt a little pointless. And the gifts of the humans as well as the shapeshifters seem a little perfunctory, as if the Urban Fantasy setting is just sideline of the story. Which makes no sense even to me, as the shapeshifters are the driving force in this. I am still mulling it over. If I figure it out, I'll let you know!
cathepsut: (book hand)
[personal profile] cathepsut
"What is Dewey’s 24-Hour Read-a-thon? For 24 hours, we read books, post to our blogs about our reading, and visit other readers’ blogs. We also participate in mini-challenges throughout the day. It happens twice a year, in April and in October."

I am crazy and I love to read, so it took me only a few minutes to convince myself that signing up to this is a great idea. I'm #171 on the participant's list and I will blog about my progress through goodreads. My goodreads is linked to Facebook, so I can simultaneously annoy you at both sites.

It happens on the 9th of April and I guess the beginning time is set at midnight in the US somewhere -- at my location it starts somewhere around 2pm on that Saturday. No idea if I will manage for 24 hours and I hope nothing will crop up that will make it impossible for me to actually do it.
moem: Animated pic of Little Mole reading a book (molletje leest)
[personal profile] moem
(Posted in Announcements by BCRegionMgrTeam.)

Hi all --

We're getting ready to do some really cool things on the site for OBCZs (some of you have noticed a little bit of the preliminaries.) This hasn't even been announced to the full Region Manager team, but since the weekend's coming and you might have a bit more time, I thought I'd go ahead and post.

If you can private message (to the BCRegionMgrTeam shelf: http://www.bookcrossing.com/mybookshelf/BCRegionMgrTeam/) the following information on your OBCZ some nifty things will be happening.

* The Go Hunting link for books released at your OBCZ: (you can get this by finding a book wild released at this zone and then clicking on the release location. This will bring up a list of all books released at this zone that are still in the wild.) Copy the url and paste it in your message to us.

* ONE screen name that is the OBCZ Manager. If there are more of you, choose one or create a bookshelf where you all have equal access (if not one already) and give the name of that bookshelf

* OBCZ Name

* Screen name if there is one

* Is this zone still an OBCZ or not?

* Nice, but not mandatory: Street address for the OBCZ. We can always add this in later if it's not given now.

Thanks a lot! Don't forget to update (or create) your listing in the OBCZ wiki, too! This same information is useful there.

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